Uncommon Reads Highlights

Written by: Brian Paulsen
Copyedited by: Tara Kari

Ask any UF Honors student about the Uncommon Reads and, more likely than not, they’ll have something positive to say. The Uncommon Reads are a standout part of the Honors program and many Honors students have fond memories from their experiences with them. The Uncommon Reads are engaging, thought provoking experiences that cover a wide variety of literary and academic topics. Every semester, a host of courses is offered in everything from Victorian fiction to political theory and this fall is no exception. 

For lovers of theatre there’s the Alexander Hamilton course, which explores the biography by Rod Chernow and the play “Hamilton” by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Several Uncommon Reads courses center around staples of fiction from a number of different genres, such as “The Poisonwood Bible,” “Frankenstein,” “A Scanner Darkly” and even” The Lord of the Rings.” Even more courses focus on the humanities and topics like race, gender and sexuality in society, such as “How to be Antiracist,” “How to Kill a City,” “Boondock Kollage” and “Intellectual Freedom.” For those with a greater interest in science, math and the natural world, courses such as “Madagascar,” “The Sixth Extinction,” “Stone Speak” and “Proofs from the BOOK” should be of particular note. 

The courses listed above represent a wide and varied selection of options for students and yet they are only a small fraction of the wealth of topics and stories explored by the Uncommon Reads. If you haven’t taken an Uncommon Read, chances are there’s one out there that will fit your interests. Taking an Uncommon Read isn’t just a great way to earn academic points, but also to meet other Honors students with similar interests and learn more about topics that you find interesting. More information about the Uncommon Reads and a catalog of the offerings for next semester can be found on the UF Honors website.

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